10 excuses not to train and how to avoid them

Zuzka ZavodnaCrossfit Committed, crossfit tips, Uncategorized0 Comments

I am a big coach Ben Bergeron fan, he is the owner of CrossFit New England and coaches Katrin Davidsdottir or Matt Fraser. His opinions and training methods should be an example for all of us. He recently published a book called “Chasing Excellence” and in it writes that our DNA in hope for survival makes us remember negative information over positive. Therefore we often need to relearn the positive approach, for most of us this is a conscious decision for how we approach life. Which is why Ben has these three rules at his gym: NEVER WHINE. NEVER COMPLAIN. NEVER MAKE EXCUSES. Easy to claim, hard to do. I myself  often complain and look for excuses. So I chose  Top 10 excuses I hear around the gym and looked for tips to get over them. Excuse #1: It is dark/cold/raining/snowing … etc. Sadly this is simply the case with winter. Summer brings on the heat, spring blooming flowers and in the fall we slip on fallen leaves. Wherever you go you won’t escape the weather. I agree, winter makes it way harder to get up in the morning, to start moving, but that is NOT a reason for you … Read More

Assessing Values and Goals, Part III: Application to Training

Ryan ODonnellUncategorized0 Comments

The following is a 3 part series dealing with assessing or reassessing your gym values and goals and how to then apply your training to those goals. In a more basic sense, I want you to find your reasons WHY you come to the gym and then help you figure out HOW to apply your training to those reasons. This is part 3: Application to Training For 99% of the population, I think that the standard 3-5 times a week CrossFit routine with a decent diet will get you and keep you as fit as you need to be. This post is aimed mainly at those who strive to do more. Many of the more experienced athletes at the gym may have noticed me asking them a lot of questions about their extra training: “Why are you doing barbell club and a class WOD in the same day?” “Why are you working on your butterfly/muscle up/HSPU/etc. so often?” “Why are you doing some extra weightlifting/cardio/etc. today?” The typical answers I get to these questions sound like this: “Because my lifting sucks.” “Because I need to get better at muscle ups.” “Because I need to improve my cardio.” “Because I have … Read More

Assessing Values and Goals, Part II: Finding your "Whys"

Ryan ODonnellUncategorized0 Comments

The following is a 3 part series dealing with assessing or reassessing your gym values and goals and how to then apply your training to those goals. In a more basic sense, I want you to find your reasons WHY you come to the gym and then help you figure out HOW to apply your training to those reasons. This is part two: Finding your “whys” Evaluating the reasons you exercise sounds easy, yet it’s anything but. Since I was a teenager I fluctuated in and out of being fit and being unfit with regularity. Looking back, the reason is obvious, I was never truly committed. I wasn’t committed because the reasons I trained weren’t deep enough to inspire me to stick with it. In high school it was to get in shape for lacrosse season and after high school it was typically to lose weight. However, right after lacrosse season ended or right after I met my target weight I slowly drifted out of the gym and back onto the couch. In the book “Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance” by Robert Pirsig there’s a passage where the main character talks about going to climb a mountain in … Read More

Assessing Values and Goals, Part I: Why I Train

Ryan ODonnellUncategorized0 Comments

The following is a 3 part series dealing with assessing  values and goals. I want to help you find your reasons WHY you come to the gym and then help you figure out HOW to train appropriately. This is part one: Why I train.  “Why do you work out?” I’m sure you’ve faced this question. My friends who don’t regularly regularly exercise often ask me why I spend so much time working out. This isn’t an easy question to answer. Personally, it took me a long time to finally figure it out. The cliché answers are mostly the same, “to lose weight,” “to look better” or “to be in better shape.”  These answers are fine as a starting point. However, I feel that a deeper connection to exercise is needed before you can truly begin to experience all the positive effects that fitness can bring to your life. Furthermore, the deeper your connection the more motivated you to train. Which makes it more likely fitness becomes a lifelong passion. Over the last year, I’ve realized what’s really important to me. This realization carried over into my training, helping me realize I was working out for the wrong reasons. The training … Read More

CrossFit Committed's 4th Annual Throwdown!

Joey Scafidicompetition, Crossfit Committed, health, news, Uncategorized0 Comments

As I write this, our 4th annual CrossFit Committed Throwdown has just ended and I wanted to write a few thoughts from the day while it’s still fresh in my mind.   Nearly 70 of our amazing members came out and competed in our one day event that had everyone complete 4 workouts before we cut the field for the final workout.   Every year we have to poke, prod, bribe, force, and beg our members to sign up and that’s always because we’re trying to get our members that have never competed before to do so and, understandably, they’re always very nervous. However, we as coaches know what’s in store for them if we do get them to put themselves out there and register! So often it happens that our members get their first pull up, muscle up, rope climb, break weightlifting PRs, and just generally accomplish awesome things that they haven’t done in the past!     When there’s no option to scale (as we always give and encourage during our daily training) and when there’s a crowd of people yelling in your face – it’s make it or break it time. Sometimes you make it and it’s the … Read More

Why I love sleds and what we can do with them

Ryan ODonnellCrossfit Committed, crossfit equipment, strength, Uncategorized0 Comments

A few posts ago I wrote a post about my love of sandbags and some ways they can be used in order to help you get fitter. This week I’m going to talk about the other tool I use during the bulk of my training that, like the sandbag, I feel is underused in most Crossfit gyms, the sled. So…why do I love it? It’s brainless Teaching someone even a simple movement, such as the deadlift, requires time and patience. The time it takes to be proficient enough in the movement to the point where you can perform at a high intensity takes even longer. However, it only takes a few seconds to teach someone how to push a sled. Which makes it a great tool for people who are total fitness beginners. It’s safe and won’t lead to pain Injuries are a part of all sports and training regimens, including CrossFit. If you think about the types of injuries we’ve seen in our gym most of them include jumping (i.e. box jumps) or falls (i.e. off the pull up bar or rope). Furthermore, many of the nagging injuries we see around the gym involve load-bearing movements. Think of sore … Read More

How to use and wear grips

Tomas Horakcrossfit equipment, crossfit tips, Uncategorized0 Comments

Lately I’ve heard a lot of you complain that gymnastics movements on the rig/rings make your hands hurt or tear them up. There are many reasons why this happens. One can be bad technique, second not enough palm protection. I will not dive into bad technique, that’s a topic for another post, I will talk about option two: not enough protection, choosing wrong or not wearing gloves/grips/tape/you-name-it properly. Gloves If you wear gloves for kipping (or butterfly) movements on the rig or the rings you must love pain. Leave them in your backpack and only take them out for rope climbs, sandbag cleans, sled pushes, etc. when, unlike with gymnastics, they can actually help you. Grips These are your best accessory and companions for gymnastic movements. They are super simple and made of two pieces of leather with holes for your fingers and a band that wraps them around your wrist. The easiness of putting them on however does not reflect on how easy they are to use. I see many of you buy and wear them wrong, which is why you still leave with torn hands after workouts like CINDY or FRAN. How to wear grips? Most of you … Read More

Building mental fortitude to reach new heights

tobiCrossfit Committed, crossfit tips, health, Uncategorized0 Comments

mental toughness

Better safe than sorry Before I go into the topic of mental toughness I want to emphasise what many couches mentioned before and is part of our introduction to CrossFit. Safety, technique, consistency and then intensity are important to us. This is especially true in the beginning of your CrossFit journey. Notice the word journey – it is not a sprint. Make sure to stay within your physical capacity to not get injured. As soon as technique breaks, in any movement, scale it! ☺ In your first 3 months to one year you will most likely make leaps and bounds of improvements. This however is not only due to increased metabolic capacity and strength but more likely due to technique which makes it possible to ‘catch’ the new PRs. So always remember, if you were not exposed to this kind of weight training before (especially with repetitive movements), your muscles might be able to lift the weight however, your joints, ligaments and bones take longer to adapt to the new challenge. Mental toughness This does not mean that you cannot work on your mental toughness from the very get go of your journey. Mental toughness is individual resilience and confidence … Read More

Standards and RX, Is it worth the risk?

Ryan ODonnellUncategorized0 Comments

CrossFit is full of standards, “full lock out,” “hip crease below the knee,” “the bar must be received in a squat position in one fluid motion,” etc. On top of that, every WOD you see in your box will have RX weight and movement specifications. These standards and specifications serve an important purpose and provide nice goals to shoot for. However, they should only be met if you can perform the movement properly and safely. This post aims to outline some of the issues that arise from athletes pushing to meet standards or “go RX” and some of the most problematic movements. WHAT IS A STANDARD? A standard, in my understanding, is put in place to ensure that movements are performed consistently by all athletes. This can vary from sport to sport (I.E. power lifting, Oly lifting, Crossfit), competition to competition (can you hold your opposite foot on a pistol? Does a squat clean thruster count as our first rep on this WOD?) and even gym to gym (Do we have to jump on the burpee or just open the hips?). HOW CAN STANDARDS BE PROBLEMATIC? Standards don’t care about technique, plain and simple. In the CrossFit judges course they … Read More

How does alcohol affect our performance?

Dora Stenclovahealth, nutrition, Uncategorized0 Comments

alcohol crossfit

If you’ve ever been to one of our CrossFit Committed parties, whether it was the popular Christmas party or pre/post Open party at WOD & Rest, you’ve probably noticed that CrossFitters like to have a few drinks. In the summer, when it’s nice and warm outside it is tempting sit and enjoy a drink (or two) at your favorite beer garden. Which is why we are going to look at how our bodies process alcohol and how much drinking affects our performance. How do we process alcohol? Various factors -weight, sex, how fast we drink it, or whether we drink on an empty stomach- affect how fast our metabolism tackles alcohol. However, the process is always the same. First, it is processed, then distributed through out the body and then degraded. When we drink, the alcohol (ethanol) travels straight to our stomach where it is immediately absorbed (about 20-25%) into our bloodstream. The rest continues to the small intestine, where it is reabsorbed into the bloodstream. Once absorbed, it continues to our liver where it is metabolised. Usually, it takes up about 90 minutes to absorb 14 grams of alcohol (about 1 beer, wine, or a shot of hard alcohol). However, the speed … Read More